SMS

Thursday, October 22

16:30 - 17:30  h
Room:
TBD
IG&C Panel Session Session
Session Leader
Jeanine P. Porck Oklahoma State University
Libby Weber University of California, Irvine

All Sessions in Track P

Thursday: 16:30 - 17:30 h   |   Session 1629
Behavioral Strategy in a Time of Disruption

Monday: 12:00 - 13:00 h   |   Session 1727
From Inertia to Change

Monday: 13:45 - 14:45 h   |   Session 1704
Heuristics, Analogies and Cognitive Shortcuts

Tuesday: 12:00 - 13:00 h   |   Session 1708
Performance Feedback Revisited

Tuesday: 13:45 - 14:45 h   |   Session 1860
Changing Paths and Sense-making

Wednesday: 12:00 - 13:00 h   |   Session 1703
Diversity, Learning and Performance

Wednesday: 12:00 - 13:00 h   |   Session 1714
Crime and Punishment

Wednesday: 13:45 - 14:45 h   |   Session 1711
Biases: Their Consequences and Remedies

Wednesday: 13:45 - 14:45 h   |   Session 1713
More Attention to Microfoundations

Thursday: 12:00 - 13:00 h   |   Session 1712
Thinking about Others

Thursday: 12:00 - 13:00 h   |   Session 1726
Organizational Structure and Innovation

Thursday: 13:45 - 14:45 h   |   Session 1699
CEOs Matters

Thursday: 13:45 - 14:45 h   |   Session 1700
Humans and Machines that Search

Friday: 12:00 - 13:00 h   |   Session 1706
Categories and Cognition

Friday: 13:45 - 14:45 h   |   Session 1707
New Strategies and Mental Models

Tracks P
Session 1629 -
Behavioral Strategy in a Time of Disruption

Behavioral strategy speaks to how psychological, social, and political factors influence the strategic actions of organizations. Behavioral strategy research includes examinations of issues such as attention, cognition, emotions, sensemaking, routines, learning, motivation, and cognitive biases. Insights on how decision makers navigate their environment are especially relevant in a time of disruption and uncertainty. In this session, we bring together a set of leading scholars who have examined how strategic decision makers act in disruptive environments and in response to shocks. The panel will discuss lessons we can take from prior settings to understand how firms tend to respond to and should respond to major disruptive events, such as the COVID-19 crisis.

Panelists
Philip Bromiley
University of California, Irvine

Nicolai Foss
Bocconi University

Jackson Nickerson
Washington University in St. Louis

Murat Tarakci
Erasmus University Rotterdam