Session 39

Who is a stakeholder?

Track M

Date: Monday, October 5, 2015

Track C

Time: 08:00 – 09:15

Paper

Room: Governor's Square 14


Session Chair:

  • Jeffrey Harrison, University of Richmond

Title: A Practitioner Critique of a Conceptual Paper on Measuring Value and Firm Performance

Authors

  • Andrew Wicks, University of Virginia
  • Jeffrey Harrison, University of Richmond

Abstract: Much of the business literature suggests that firm performance should be measured in financial terms, based on the notion that the primary obligation of a corporation is to provide high shareholder returns. An alternative literature is emerging in which scholars identify the many weaknesses associated with shareholder primacy, and offer alternative performance measures that are focused on a broader set of stakeholders. One such publication was provided to high-level executives in large companies. The executives were then given the opportunity to critique the paper and to discuss the extent to which their firms are engaging in the types of performance measurement activities contained therein. This proposal is a direct response to the call by SMS leaders to engage practitioners in useful dialogues within our Society.

Title: Competitors as Stakeholders: Extending Nonmarket Strategy

Authors

  • Suvi Nenonen, University of Auckland
  • Peter Smith, University of Auckland
  • Kaj Storbacka, University of Auckland
  • Joel Allen, University of Auckland

Abstract: A firm’s stakeholders are a necessary component in nonmarket strategies, yet consideration should go beyond the traditional nonmarket stakeholders of—for example, activist stakeholders—and should include market stakeholders as they can also participate in nonmarket strategies. Empirically we draw on three illustrative case studies that show the role of competitors participating in nonmarket strategies in a range of contexts. The key contribution of this paper is that collaboration with competitors can enable a variety of nonmarket strategies that advances the firms’ competitive position. This contribution is important as it demonstrates how collaboration with competitors—which would often be illegal in the context of market strategy—can be a legitimate approach to nonmarket strategy. In addition, we present three testable propositions regarding the sustainability of nonmarket strategies when they are undertaken with competitors.

Title: Which Stakeholder are You Now? Exploring the Consequences and Management of Conflicting Stakeholder Group Identities

Authors

  • Flore Bridoux, University of Amsterdam
  • Arno Kourula, University of Amsterdam

Abstract: Stakeholder theorists have seldom studied individual stakeholders’ multiple identities. This study employs insights from the identity literature to explore conflicting stakeholder group identities, both from the stakeholder and firm perspectives. We develop a set of propositions on the negative consequences of conflicting identities on the attitudes and behaviors of stakeholders toward a firm. Furthermore, we offer four avenues for managers to address conflicting stakeholder group identities – emphasizing, compartmentalizing, suppressing, and integrating conflicting stakeholder identities – and illustrate these avenues using examples. Our work contributes to the burgeoning field exploring the micro-foundations of stakeholder theory.

All Sessions in Track M...

Sun: 08:00 – 09:15
Session 49: Stakeholder Strategy and Corporate Growth
Sun: 09:45 – 11:00
Session 48: On Teaching CSR as a Strategic Management Topic
Sun: 11:15 – 12:30
Session 47: On the Emerging B Corp Phenomenon and the Future of Capitalism
Sun: 17:45 – 00:00
Session 322: Stakeholder Strategy Business Meeting
Mon: 08:00 – 09:15
Session 39: Who is a stakeholder?
Mon: 11:15 – 12:30
Session 34: New Explanations of Contextual Differences in CSR
Session 244: Legitimacy, Stakeholders, and Competition
Session 257: Explaining CSR: Internal Factors
Mon: 13:45 – 15:00
Session 37: Political Ties: Knots or Bows?
Mon: 16:45 – 18:00
Session 42: The Word is Out! Stakeholder Responses to Public Signals of Firms' Behaviors
Session 89: Integrating Theories of Stakeholders, Ownership, Governance and Boards
Tue: 08:00 – 09:15
Session 43: First Principles in Creating Value: Stakeholder Theory
Tue: 11:00 – 12:15
Session 260: CSR Challenges
Tue: 14:15 – 15:30
Session 44: What's New? Intersecting Stakeholders with Entrepreneurial Industries, Firms, and Organizational Forms
Tue: 15:45 – 17:00
Session 46: Accidents, Disasters, and Stakeholder Demands
Session 265: Performance Effects of CSR and Non Market Strategy
Tue: 17:30 – 18:45
Session 90: Stakeholder Strategies in Emerging Markets

All Sessions in Track C...

Sun: 11:15 – 12:30
Session 47: On the Emerging B Corp Phenomenon and the Future of Capitalism
Sun: 16:15 – 17:30
Session 223: Hybrid organizations and business model heterogeneity
Mon: 08:00 – 09:15
Session 39: Who is a stakeholder?
Mon: 11:15 – 12:30
Session 34: New Explanations of Contextual Differences in CSR
Session 222: Profit and nonprofit organizations: Patterns of collaboration and competition
Mon: 13:45 – 15:00
Session 224: Balancing profit and nonprofit objectives across different business models
Tue: 08:00 – 09:15
Session 43: First Principles in Creating Value: Stakeholder Theory
Tue: 11:00 – 12:15
Session 225: Institutional logics, legitimacy, and embeddedness in profit and nonprofit organizations
Tue: 15:45 – 17:00
Session 46: Accidents, Disasters, and Stakeholder Demands
Session 93: Blending CSR, Non-Profit, Symbolic Management and Practitioner Focus Perspectives
Session 226: Trust, loyalty, compassion: The role of resources in balancing multiple objectives


Strategic Management Society

Denver