Session 34

New Explanations of Contextual Differences in CSR

Track M

Date: Monday, October 5, 2015

Track C

Time: 11:15 – 12:30

Paper

Room: Director's Row J


Session Chair:

  • Yi Tang, Hong Kong Polytechnic University

Title: Bound by Destiny: Urban-Rural Divide and Corporate Philanthropy

Authors

  • Tao Wang, Grenoble School of Management
  • Maggie Mei, Grenoble School of Management

Abstract: In this paper, we tackle the structural factors that influence firms’ engagement in corporate philanthropy. Drawing on sociology of modernity and corporate political action literature, we advance the argument that urban-rural divide constitutes a two-tier socio-spatial structure, which affects social sensitivity and economic necessity of firms with regard to corporate philanthropy. We demonstrate the theoretical significance of our perspective by investigating the effect of urban-rural divide on philanthropy donation of Chinese SMEs. Findings suggest that SMEs originating from rural areas spend less in philanthropy compared with SMEs from urban areas. Yet, if a SME’s owner has previous government work experience and therefore is more exposed to political and economic trends, the negative effect of rural origin on donation is attenuated.

Title: CSR Policy-practices (De)coupling within MNEs: Paths to Walking the Talk

Authors

  • Anne Jacqueminet, Bocconi University

Abstract: This paper aims at proposing a model of the dynamics of coportate social responsibility (CSR) policy-practices coupling and decoupling within multinational enterprises (MNEs), depicting the various paths to increased or decreased implementation of the corporate CSR Policy by MNEs' subsidiaries. By studying the implementation of 25 different practices in an MNE at three points in time and applying a fuzzy set QCA, this work better articulates and prioritizes the impacts of practices characteristics and institutionalization levels on their coupling by the subsidiaries and suggests that there might be multiple paths to the implementation of a CSR policy, that coupling is a complex and dynamic process, depending on various characteristics of the practices considered.

Title: Is the CSP-CFP Relationship Different by Country? Possibility of National-level Institutions as Moderators

Authors

  • Jiyoung Shin, Korea University
  • Jungbien Moon, Korea University
  • Jingoo Kang, Nanyang Technological University

Abstract: We investigate the possibility that the relationship between corporate social performance (CSP) and corporate financial performance (CFP) can manifest itself differently by country as it is moderated by national institutional characteristics. We classify diverse national institutions into Scott’s three pillars: regulative, normative, and cognitive, and suggest factors that can moderate the CSP-CFP relationship. We test our hypotheses using a large-scale social performance data over 18 countries for years 2002 through 2012. Preliminary findings suggest that regulative characteristics such as freedom of competition and political stability positively moderate the CSP-CFP relationship. Normative characteristics such as NGO activity and education level also turn out to moderate the relationship positively. It seems, however, that there is limited evidence that cognitive characteristics have any moderating effect on the relationship.

Title: May God Bless You: How Community Religiosity Affects Corporate Social Responsibility

Authors

  • Yi Tang, Hong Kong Polytechnic University
  • G. Mujtaba Mian, Hong Kong Polytechnic University
  • Guoli Chen, INSEAD

Abstract: This study explores the influence of religiosity on firm corporate social responsibility (CSR) engagement. Motivated by the instrumental stakeholder theory and the religion research, we argue that firms located in a highly religious community tend to contribute less to CSR. This is because community religiosity leads to social cohesion, which generates enough social support, reducing firms’ incentive to invest in CSR as a way to obtain stakeholders’ support. With a large sample of U.S. public firms from 2000 to 2010, we found that firms located in a county with a higher degree of religiosity record a lower level of CSR. This effect is stronger when firms are subject to greater local community influence: when the firm’s operations are less geographically diversified and when more of the firm’s shareholders are concentrated locally.

All Sessions in Track M...

Sun: 08:00 – 09:15
Session 49: Stakeholder Strategy and Corporate Growth
Sun: 09:45 – 11:00
Session 48: On Teaching CSR as a Strategic Management Topic
Sun: 11:15 – 12:30
Session 47: On the Emerging B Corp Phenomenon and the Future of Capitalism
Sun: 17:45 – 00:00
Session 322: Stakeholder Strategy Business Meeting
Mon: 08:00 – 09:15
Session 39: Who is a stakeholder?
Mon: 11:15 – 12:30
Session 34: New Explanations of Contextual Differences in CSR
Session 244: Legitimacy, Stakeholders, and Competition
Session 257: Explaining CSR: Internal Factors
Mon: 13:45 – 15:00
Session 37: Political Ties: Knots or Bows?
Mon: 16:45 – 18:00
Session 42: The Word is Out! Stakeholder Responses to Public Signals of Firms' Behaviors
Session 89: Integrating Theories of Stakeholders, Ownership, Governance and Boards
Tue: 08:00 – 09:15
Session 43: First Principles in Creating Value: Stakeholder Theory
Tue: 11:00 – 12:15
Session 260: CSR Challenges
Tue: 14:15 – 15:30
Session 44: What's New? Intersecting Stakeholders with Entrepreneurial Industries, Firms, and Organizational Forms
Tue: 15:45 – 17:00
Session 46: Accidents, Disasters, and Stakeholder Demands
Session 265: Performance Effects of CSR and Non Market Strategy
Tue: 17:30 – 18:45
Session 90: Stakeholder Strategies in Emerging Markets

All Sessions in Track C...

Sun: 11:15 – 12:30
Session 47: On the Emerging B Corp Phenomenon and the Future of Capitalism
Sun: 16:15 – 17:30
Session 223: Hybrid organizations and business model heterogeneity
Mon: 08:00 – 09:15
Session 39: Who is a stakeholder?
Mon: 11:15 – 12:30
Session 34: New Explanations of Contextual Differences in CSR
Session 222: Profit and nonprofit organizations: Patterns of collaboration and competition
Mon: 13:45 – 15:00
Session 224: Balancing profit and nonprofit objectives across different business models
Tue: 08:00 – 09:15
Session 43: First Principles in Creating Value: Stakeholder Theory
Tue: 11:00 – 12:15
Session 225: Institutional logics, legitimacy, and embeddedness in profit and nonprofit organizations
Tue: 15:45 – 17:00
Session 46: Accidents, Disasters, and Stakeholder Demands
Session 93: Blending CSR, Non-Profit, Symbolic Management and Practitioner Focus Perspectives
Session 226: Trust, loyalty, compassion: The role of resources in balancing multiple objectives


Strategic Management Society

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