Session 244

Legitimacy, Stakeholders, and Competition

Track E

Date: Monday, October 5, 2015

Track M

Time: 11:15 – 12:30

Common Ground

Room: Plaza Court 1


Facilitator:

  • Rodolphe Durand, HEC-Paris

Title: Contested Environments: Drivers and Dynamics in the U.S. Marijuana Industry

Authors

  • Dara Szyliowicz, University of the Pacific
  • Tammy Madsen, Santa Clara University

Abstract: Contested industries face numerous challenges to the appropriateness of their products or services, operational practices, strategies and/or forms. Such challenges typically play a critical role in shaping an industry during its early development (DiMaggio, 1991; Rao, 1994) or after it experiences a transformative shock (Galvin et al., 2004; Madsen and Walker, 2007; Sine and David, 2003). However, when an industry is characterized by multiple conflicting normative, regulatory and cognitive sources of contestation as well as heterogeneous actors who are endogenous and exogenous to the industry, it may be more susceptible to ongoing contestation. Under these conditions, persistent heterogeneity among actors and initiatives may impede an industry’s development and growth. How do these multiple, conflicting and persistent sources of contestation affect an industry’s development and growth? We explore this question in an industry that has encountered considerable societal attention and regulatory debate, the U.S. Marijuana industry.

Title: Debunking “Greenwashing”: Antecedents of the Strategic Choice to Decouple Talk from Action

Authors

  • Rodolphe Durand, HEC-Paris
  • Olga Hawn, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Ioannis Ioannou, London Business School

Abstract: We debunk the concept of greenwashing by developing theory that is broadly based on the concepts of conformity and compliance, symbolic and substantive actions. Our goal is to understand and characterize the behavioral antecedents of a monolithically-perceived, yet fundamentally strategic and complex organizational practice. We address this question at three levels of analysis: the issue, the organization, and the institutional environment. We develop a process model whereby firms decide whether and in what way to decouple their practices from their policies based on the perceived materiality of the issue at hand, on a calculus of the costs and benefits related to the use of their own resources and capabilities, and on the strength of the institutional pressures. We conclude with several propositions for future research.

Title: Impression Management Strategies in Response to Social Barriers to Entry

Authors

  • Chethan Srikant, Western University
  • Jean-Philippe Vergne, University of Western Ontario

Abstract: Using literatures on impression management and social communities we examine a firm’s response to social barriers to entry (community opposition to a new facility or service proposed by a firm seeking to enter a location-constrained industry). Extant literature has shown that firms use positive claims to legitimize their proposals by drawing attention towards positive attributes. This paper argues that, as a complementary response, firms can use negative claims to delegitimize certain external constituents and dissuade them from participating in the contestation. The complementary nature of positive and negative claims can also help firms to deal with the asymmetrical threats represented by community insiders and outsiders. Longitudinal analysis of all proposals for new LNG import terminals in the U.S. from 2000 to 2013 supports our theory.

Title: The Influence of Institutions on Trust and Governance

Authors

  • Anne Parmigiani, University of Oregon
  • Miguel Rivera-Santos, Babson College

Abstract: This paper explores how institutional contexts affect trust and, in turn, governance in interorganizational exchanges. Bringing together the literatures on governance, as well economic and sociological perspectives on trust, we present a framework that connects three types of trust – competence, integrity, and benevolence – and the propensity to trust to formal and informal institutions. We discuss how these institutions affect trust and its role as a governance mechanism both alone and in conjunction with formal mechanisms. Our analysis uncovers a complex set of relationships between trust and governance. We posit that different types of trust fulfill different roles in governance, and that the extent to which these roles are complementary or substitutes is influenced by the regulative, normative, and cultural institutional environments.

Title: Value Appropriation and Value Creation: Empirical Evidence in the Mining Industry

Authors

  • Jorge Tarzijan, Catholic University of Chile
  • Francisco Brahm, University of Cambridge
  • Cristian Ramirez, University of California - Los Angeles

Abstract: The analysis of the determinants of the value captured by different agents is a fundamental issue in strategic management. Despite its importance, there is very little empirical work on the determinants of value capture and the contingencies that may affect it. We empirically evaluate value captured by the employees and by the focal firm and assess how the relative value appropriation of each of these parties is moderated by different institutional characteristics and by the productivity of the employees. Our setting is the mining industry. We have very detailed information about the general performance of the population of copper mines operating in different geographic contexts and countries for the period 2000 - 2008.

All Sessions in Track E...

Sun: 08:00 – 09:15
Session 28: The Latest and Greatest in Empirical Methods for Strategy Scholars
Sun: 09:45 – 11:00
Session 29: The Elephant in the Room: How public policy and institutions help drive innovation, entrepreneurship, and firm performance
Sun: 11:15 – 12:30
Session 30: Heterogeneity in Firms and Their Pre-entry Capabilities: Implications for Firm and Industry Evolution
Sun: 16:15 – 17:30
Session 229: How Resources Change in Dynamic Situations
Sun: 17:45 – 00:00
Session 313: Competitive Strategy Business Meeting
Mon: 08:00 – 09:15
Session 273: Complexity in Competition
Mon: 11:15 – 12:30
Session 244: Legitimacy, Stakeholders, and Competition
Mon: 13:45 – 15:00
Session 242: Value Creation in Buyers-Supplier Relationships and Ecosystems
Mon: 16:45 – 18:00
Session 238: Temporary and Long Term Competitive Advantage
Session 243: Competitive Dynamics and Market Positioning
Tue: 08:00 – 09:15
Session 272: Competitive Dimensions of Firm Boundary and Location Decisions
Tue: 11:00 – 12:15
Session 230: Multi-Market Competition and Mutual Forbearance
Session 264: Emerging Technologies and Industries
Tue: 14:15 – 15:30
Session 267: Healthcare Industry Dynamics, Relationships, and Activities
Tue: 15:45 – 17:00
Session 269: Exploration, Exploitation, and Competition
Tue: 17:30 – 18:45
Session 263: Developing a Value Creation Theory

All Sessions in Track M...

Sun: 08:00 – 09:15
Session 49: Stakeholder Strategy and Corporate Growth
Sun: 09:45 – 11:00
Session 48: On Teaching CSR as a Strategic Management Topic
Sun: 11:15 – 12:30
Session 47: On the Emerging B Corp Phenomenon and the Future of Capitalism
Sun: 17:45 – 00:00
Session 322: Stakeholder Strategy Business Meeting
Mon: 08:00 – 09:15
Session 39: Who is a stakeholder?
Mon: 11:15 – 12:30
Session 34: New Explanations of Contextual Differences in CSR
Session 244: Legitimacy, Stakeholders, and Competition
Session 257: Explaining CSR: Internal Factors
Mon: 13:45 – 15:00
Session 37: Political Ties: Knots or Bows?
Mon: 16:45 – 18:00
Session 42: The Word is Out! Stakeholder Responses to Public Signals of Firms' Behaviors
Session 89: Integrating Theories of Stakeholders, Ownership, Governance and Boards
Tue: 08:00 – 09:15
Session 43: First Principles in Creating Value: Stakeholder Theory
Tue: 11:00 – 12:15
Session 260: CSR Challenges
Tue: 14:15 – 15:30
Session 44: What's New? Intersecting Stakeholders with Entrepreneurial Industries, Firms, and Organizational Forms
Tue: 15:45 – 17:00
Session 46: Accidents, Disasters, and Stakeholder Demands
Session 265: Performance Effects of CSR and Non Market Strategy
Tue: 17:30 – 18:45
Session 90: Stakeholder Strategies in Emerging Markets


Strategic Management Society

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