Session 17

Human Capital and Entrepreneurship

Track L

Date: Tuesday, October 6, 2015

Track I

Time: 15:45 – 17:00

Paper

Room: Director's Row I


Session Chair:

  • Melissa Appleyard, Portland State University

Title: Inventor Mobility and Firm Strategy in the U.S. Laser Industry

Authors

  • Erin Fahrenkopf, Carnegie Mellon University

Abstract: Building off studies that link inventor mobility and knowledge flow across firms, I argue that inventors with prior organizational experiences are not unconditional sources of outside knowledge. Instead, I posit that individuals working in high-tech industries face continual changes in the need for their skills and therefore move between firms where their backgrounds fit to a varying degree across time. It is only when an inventor’s background fits the technological strategy of the recruiting firm that there will be an increase in the firm’s use of the recruits’ prior ideas, but not otherwise. The study focuses on the laser industry using patent and firm production data and also interviews with those in the industry.

Title: Stars and Their Constellations: Great Person or Great team?

Authors

  • Janet Bercovitz, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Maryann Feldman, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Denisa Mindruta, HEC-Paris

Abstract: This paper examines star scientists and team performance in the context of academic entrepreneurship. We employ a matching model of value creation to estimate complementarities between team leaders and teams. Through an extension of the matching model we explore whether the "penalty" of not being matched efficiently would be bigger for the stars than for their teams. We find that counterfactual pairing of stars with non-star teams creates lower synergies than counterfactual pairing of star-teams to non-star PIs. We take this result as in indication that the contribution of the constellations to overall joint performance is relatively more significant than the contribution of the stars. This study aims to illuminate the microfoundations of performance heterogeneity and draw attention to inherent trade-offs in research team organization.

Title: Unpacking Interdisciplinary R&D: How do Experience and Disciplinary Variety, Distance, and Interdependence Matter?

Authors

  • Melissa Appleyard, Portland State University
  • Beverly Tyler, North Carolina State University
  • Turanay Caner, St. John's University

Abstract: In this study we seek to explain how researchers involved in interdisciplinary R&D projects achieve greater scientific impact and rapid migration to clinical translation based on: their knowledge meshing abilities developed from prior experiences; and the nature of the disciplines represented on the interdisciplinary projects they participate in. Through an analysis of the 124 researchers in the eight Nanomedicine Development Centers (NDCs) funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in the United States, this research will assess the effects of experiences scientists have doing interdisciplinary science on the change in the number, impact, and type of their publications. This study contributes to the human capital literature by constructing an approach to assess the implications of interdisciplinary interactions to expand technological frontiers.

Title: What is Gained in Brain Gain? Explaining the Effects of Returnee Entrepreneurs on Firm Innovation

Authors

  • Xinyi Yang, Stanford University
  • Elena Obukhova, McGill University
  • Jizhen Li, Tsinghua University

Abstract: Returnee entrepreneurs appear to serve as carriers of knowledge from advanced economies to firms in emerging ones. While it is well-documented that firms established by returnees are more innovative than firms established by homegrown ones, we are only beginning to understand processes that account for this finding. In this paper we examine whether returnee entrepreneurs contribute to firm innovation directly by transferring technical knowledge and/or indirectly by transferring organizational routines that foster innovation. Using data from 971 high-tech firms in China, we find that returnee entrepreneurs and returnee employees have substitute effects on firm innovation, a finding that suggests that returnee entrepreneurs primarily bringing in technical knowledge. Our study enhances the understanding of transferability of different types of knowledge through inter-firm mobility.

All Sessions in Track L...

Sun: 08:00 – 09:15
Session 287: Strategic Human Capital in a Global Market
Sun: 09:45 – 11:00
Session 289: Seeing the Future in the Recent Past: Predicting Seminal Work
Sun: 11:15 – 12:30
Session 288: Strategy Microfoundations and Human Capital: What Have We Learned?
Sun: 16:15 – 17:30
Session 13: Employee Mobility: Barriers and Enablers
Sun: 17:45 – 00:00
Session 321: Strategic Human Capital Business Meeting
Mon: 08:00 – 09:15
Session 14: Typologies of Human Capital and Strategy
Mon: 11:15 – 12:30
Session 15: Human Capital, Company Networks, and Reputation
Session 204: Acquiring human capital: Process and outcomes
Mon: 13:45 – 15:00
Session 16: Human Capital and Innovation
Tue: 08:00 – 09:15
Session 18: Human Capital Architectures
Tue: 11:00 – 12:15
Session 19: Motivating and Governing Human Capital
Tue: 14:15 – 15:30
Session 20: New Frontiers in Human Capital Research
Tue: 15:45 – 17:00
Session 17: Human Capital and Entrepreneurship
Tue: 17:30 – 18:45
Session 21: Revisiting Theory in Strategic Human Capital Research

All Sessions in Track I...

Sun: 08:00 – 09:15
Session 276: K&I Sunday Panel: Big Data & Analytics in Strategy
Sun: 09:45 – 11:00
Session 277: K&I Foundations Session: A Conversation with Dan Levinthal
Sun: 11:15 – 12:30
Session 278: K&I Sunday Panel: Knowledge and Innovation in models of Business Models
Sun: 16:15 – 17:30
Session 104: Resource Allocation and Innovation
Session 261: Knowledge Creation and Sharing in Virtual Communities
Sun: 17:45 – 00:00
Session 317: Knowledge and Innovation Business Meeting
Mon: 08:00 – 09:15
Session 62: Multi-level perspectives on capability development
Session 105: Sourcing Strategies for Knowledge
Session 256: Innovation and the Strategy-Performance Relationship
Mon: 11:15 – 12:30
Session 203: Post Acquisition Learning
Session 204: Acquiring human capital: Process and outcomes
Mon: 13:45 – 15:00
Session 107: Evolving Industries, Evolving Products
Session 205: Knowledge Recombination and Interdependencies
Mon: 16:45 – 18:00
Session 100: Innovation Management in Networks, Ecosystems, and Innovation Hubs
Session 200: Strategic Leadership, Learning, and Exploration
Tue: 08:00 – 09:15
Session 136: Innovating and Learning in Collaborative Alliances
Session 255: Processes for Innovation and Ideation
Tue: 11:00 – 12:15
Session 101: Strategic Patenting
Session 137: Entrepreneurial Experience and Cognition: Implications for Venture Performance
Tue: 14:15 – 15:30
Session 198: Emerging Market Strategies
Session 206: Knowledge Replication, Transfer and Absorption
Tue: 15:45 – 17:00
Session 17: Human Capital and Entrepreneurship
Session 108: Open Innovation: Antecedents and Performance Effects
Session 262: Pioneering Knowledge
Tue: 17:30 – 18:45
Session 60: Blurring the Boundaries of Strategy Work
Session 202: Team Dynamics and Creativity
Session 271: Spinouts


Strategic Management Society

Denver